Sunday Pasta®: Pappardelle al Prosciutto

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Sunday Pasta Pappardelle al Proscuitto 2 640

When pigs fly!  Yeah, I’ll tell you when pigs fly.  Pigs fly every time their hind legs are cured in salt and then aged for 12-24 months in the vicinity of Parma, Italy. Pigs fly every time they are turned into prosciutto.  That’s right, they fly off the slicer at the speed of light and into my mouth. They fly non-stop when wrapped around a grissini breadstick into my mouth. When paired with mozzarella and red pepper or tomato, with delicious crusty bread, there is supersonic pig flight directly into my mouth. For me, this pig flies at warp speed as often as I can get my hands on it, no matter how or when it is served. So fasten your seat belts because if you make this papparelle al prosciutto for your guests, it’s going to be a bumpy night.

Buon Appetito!

Ed Garrubbo

Check out our wine pairings for this recipe and our About post to learn about prosciutto .

 

Sunday Pasta®: Pappardelle al Prosciutto

Total Time: 30 minutes

Serves: 4-6

Sunday Pasta<sup>®</sup>: Pappardelle al Prosciutto

Ingredients

1 lb pappardelle (or tagliatelle, fettuccine)
10 ounces prosciutto, thinly sliced
1 onion, diced
1/4 cup olive oil
16 ounces peeled tomatoes, pureed
Salt and pepper to taste
Parmigiano-Reggiano, grated

Instructions

Slice the prosciutto into thin strips. In a large skillet, heat the oil and add the onion. Cook until golden. Add the prosciutto and mix over medium heat until resolved, but be careful not to let it become crispy. Add the tomatoes and salt and pepper to taste. Cook over medium heat for 10-15 minutes, allowing the sauce to thicken slightly.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook the pasta until al dente. Drain it and add the pasta to the prosciutto mixture. Serve immediately with a sprinkle of Parmigiano.

 

Edwin Garrubbo

Edwin Garrubbo

Ed Garrubbo has been studying, cooking, searching for, and thinking about la cucina italiana for as long as he can remember. Learning from his parents and grandparents, he cooks a wide range of Italian dishes and visits restaurants, cooking schools, markets, and food artisans across Italy, and wherever Italians practice their craft. He is a member of the Accademia Italiana della Cucina, a cultural institution of the Italian government, and is also an attorney and investor. He is a citizen of both the United States and Italy.

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